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The Phantom Tollbooth - Jules Feiffer, Norton Juster Milo is a dull boy. He's bored by everything, and the world is colorless and uninteresting. And then a tollbooth appears in his room, and since he has nothing else to do, he gets in his small electric car and drives past it. The world he finds is strange, full of mistakes to make and learn from, a Kingdom of Wisdom that's lacking in Rhyme and Reason, a world where abstract ideas have become concrete. And there, Milo learns to see in color, to appreciate all of the things there are to do and see and make and break.

So, yet another absolute classic of children's literature that I hadn't read. And now I have, and I found this book to be...just okay. There wasn't a lot in the way of story or characters--oh, it reminded me more than anything of those Piers Anthony Xanth books, which I devoured when I was young, where the world, the characters, the plot, was all built around puns, around the author being clever. This book was built around a lesson, and it's a good lesson, an important lesson, and I know for a fact that the book is enjoyable for a lot of people. For me, it came across as very didactic, and fairly boring, and yes, in fact, I think the author is very clever. But a book that is devised to best display an author's cleverness is...well, I don't know. Like I said, it didn't work for me.